Protect the Land and Water Conservation Fund to Protect Places We Ride!

Take Action Before Sept. 30th!

Since 1964, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has helped create trailheads, parks, mountain bike trails and other great outdoor recreation opportunities to enjoy all across the country. Eight IMBA EPICS, from Arkansas to Montana to Wisconsin, have been made possible through LWCF funding. LWCF is a popular, bipartisan program that reinvests royalties from offshore oil and gas drilling into recreation and conservation projects across the country.

What’s the problem? The program is set to expire September 30 if not reauthorized by Congress.

 

LWCF Success in Idaho
The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has provided funding to help protect some of Idaho’s most special places and ensure recreational access for hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities. Idaho has received approximately $279 million in LWCF funding over the past five decades, protecting places such as the right here in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, the Boise Foothills, Sawtooth Valley and Hell’s Canyon National Recreation Areas, Middle Fork Clearwater and Middle Fork Salmon Wild and Scenic Rivers.

Active outdoor recreation is an important part of the Idaho economy. The Outdoor Industry Association has found that active outdoor recreation supports $7.8 billion in consumer spending in Idaho, 78,000 jobs across Idaho which generate $2.3 billion in wages and salaries, and produces nearly $447 million annually in state and local tax revenue. Further, the U.S. Census reports that each year over 1 million people hunt, fish, or enjoy wildlife-watching in Idaho, contributing over $923 million in wildlife recreation spending to the state economy.

LWCF Success in Wyoming
The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has provided funding to help protect some of Wyoming’s most special places and ensure recreational access for hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities. Wyoming has received approximately $132 million over the past five decades, protecting places such as our backyards of Grand Teton National Park, the Bridger-Teton National Forest, and the National Elk Refuge.

Active outdoor recreation is an important part of the Wyoming economy. The Outdoor Industry Association has found that active outdoor recreation generates $5.6 billion in consumer spending in Wyoming, and supports 50,000 jobs which generate $1.6 billion in wages and salaries, and produces $514 million annually in state and local tax revenue. Further, the U.S. Census reports that each year 762,000 people hunt, fish, or enjoy wildlife-watching in Wyoming, contributing $300 million in wildlife recreation spending.

So Now What?

Despite the program’s bipartisan support, 53-year history and long, impressive roster of enhancements made for trails and public lands close to home and across the country, the program is being held up by a small but strong opposition who are impeding the legislative process for reauthorization.

How can you make a difference? Contact your representatives HERE and urge them to take the initiative to champion the reauthorization of the LWCF. The more personalized the message, the better. Remember to:

  • Thank them for ongoing support for the LWCF Program
  • Ask them to please support legislation that will lead to permanent reauthorization and dedicated funding for LWCF
  • Ask them to push back against amendments that will weaken the program
  • Let them know why this is important to you—what you enjoy doing outside, like the places you love to ride, and any other activities. They need to know that real people enjoy the places LWCF helps create, enhance and protect

Idaho: 

Sen. Mike Crapo

Sen. James Risch

Rep. Mike Simpson

Rep. Raul Labrador

Wyoming:

Rep. Liz Cheney

Sen. John Barrasso

Sen. Mike Enzi