New E-bike Legislation in Idaho and Wyoming: What it means.

On February 26th, Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon signed legislation regarding specific definitions of electric bicycles (e-bikes) and where they can be ridden in the state. As of March 4th, a very similar bill has passed through the Idaho House of Representatives and is being reviewed by the Idaho Senate. With this new legislation, Idaho and Wyoming will join 11 other states with e-bike laws on their books.

So what do these bills mean? We’ve broken it down for you here.


Idaho E-Bike Law

*See the full bill HERE

The goal of the bill was in part to provide definitions of e-bikes for Idaho codes.

New E-Bike Definitions: E-Bikes are broken into 3 “Classes”

An e-bike is defined as a bicycle equipped with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of fewer than 750 watts and that meets one of the following requirements:

  • Class 1: has a motor that only engages when the rider is pedaling and shuts off when 20 mph is reached or when the rider ceases to pedal
  • Class 2: has a motor that be can be used exclusively to propel the bicycle and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour (essentially has a throttle)
  •  Class 3: has a motor that only engages when the rider is pedaling and shuts off when 28 mph is reached or when the rider ceases to pedal

Clarifies that an e-bike is not a moped, motorbike, motorcycle or motor vehicle by definition, and thus not susceptible to, driver’s licensing, insurance, title and registration requirements (same as a bicycle).

Requires e-bike riders to follow the same laws regarding stopping, yielding right-of-way, etc. as bicycles when ridden on the road.

Allows E-bikes to be ridden where bicycles are permitted to travel (including trails and multi-use paths), unless excluded by local ordinance or by signage posted by the public agency with jurisdiction. Violations of this are a ticketable offense.

Allows e-bikes on sidewalks unless otherwise prohibited by local ordinance or other public agency.

On and after September 1, 2019, manufacturers or distributors of electric bicycles must apply a permanent label, in a visible location, to each electric bicycle. The label must contain the classification number, top assisted speed, and motor wattage of the e-bike, and shall be printed in Arial font in at least 9-point type.

What does this mean for e-mountain bikes in Idaho?

  • Outside of this state statute, on Federal Lands, e-bikes are considered motorized vehicles and not permitted on system trails that are categorized as “non-motorized.”
  • The Idaho Department of Parks and Rec does not currently have an e-bike policy.

 Wyoming E-Bike Law

*See the full bill HERE

Defines an e-bike as a bicycle or tricycle equipped with fully operable pedals, a seat or saddle for the rider’s use and an electric motor of fewer than 750 watts and that meets one of the following requirements:

  • Class 1: has a motor that only engages when the rider is pedaling and shuts off when 20 mph is reached or when the rider ceases to pedal
  • Class 2: has a motor that be can be used exclusively to propel the bicycle and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour (essentially has a throttle)
  • Class 3: has a motor that only engages when the rider is pedaling and shuts off when 28 mph is reached or when the rider ceases to pedal

Clarifies that an e-bike is not a moped, motorbike, motorcycle or motor vehicle by definition, and thus not susceptible to driver’s licensing, insurance, title and registration requirements (same as a bicycle).

On and after January 1, 2020, manufacturers or distributors of electric bicycles shall apply a label that is permanently affixed, in a prominent location, to each electric bicycle. The label must contain the classification number, top assisted speed, and motor wattage of the electric bicycle, and shall be printed in Arial font in at least 9-point type.

A person cannot modify an e-bike to change the motor‑powered speed capability or motor engagement unless the person replaces the label required.

An e-bike must operate according to class so that when the rider stops pedaling, applies the brakes or the electric motor is disengaged, the electric motor assist ceases to function.

A local authority or state agency with jurisdiction may regulate the use of any class of electric bicycles on trails, including non-motorized trails, under its jurisdiction (a “trail” must have only natural surface).

The law allows for local authorities in charge of streets and/or highways to regulate the operation of bicycles and electric bicycles and require the registration and licensing of bicycles and electric bicycles, including the requirement of a registration fee if they chose to.

What does this mean for e-mountain bikes in Wyoming?

  • Outside of this state statute, on Federal Lands, e-bikes are considered motorized vehicles and not permitted on system trails that are categorized as “non-motorized.”
  • Wyoming State Parks does not currently have an e-bike policy.

**Thanks for the diligent work of our friends at the Idaho Walk Bike Alliance, Wyoming Pathways, People for Bikes and our Idaho and Wyoming delegation members for moving this important legislation forward.